LiteraryBoatyard.com

“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.”
–Antoine de Saint Exupéry

{Below blog feed from http://poemsfromtheboatyard.blogspot.com/}

Poems from the Boatyard

Do you know Rainier Maria Rilke?  A very lyrical German, Rilke was renowned for his delicate depiction of the workings of the human heart—a man after my own heart.  This is one of my goals—this delicate depiction—especially in poetry, but as part of my life and ministry in spiritual formation for artists. Perhaps it’s why I resonate so much with Rilke, and use his poems in my work. 

Recently I received a “letter"--an email:

“Patricia. If you send me one poem from Transplants, and I drool over it in awe and don’t puzzle over it due to its complexity, I will contemplate purchasing the whole book.”—F


Challenge accepted. 

We began an email thread that was positively delicious.  He appreciated my guided tour through 2 poems, as much as I appreciated his way with words, and final enthusiasm for the poems.  He decided to order Transplants (happy dance). 

Our correspondence reminded me of Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet—“written to a young man about to enter the German military. His name was Franz Kappus, he was 19 years old, and he wrote Rilke looking for guidance and a critique of some of his poems. Rilke was himself only 27 when the first letter was written. The resulting five year correspondence is a virtual owner's manual on what it is (and what is required) to be an artist and a person.”—Billy Carrothers***

The idea was born, in the midst of our email flurry, to create my own “Letters," following Rilke’s lead.  My friend is not alone. Poetry is so foreign to most Americans, and FOAS (fear of appearing stupid) inhibits many rich, fruitful and enlivening conversations. 

Can I dare you not to dwell in FOAS, but ask a question.  Ask me what a poem means! 

Better yet, I’ll be posting some of the poems soon and how they came to be.  I hope it whets your appetite for more poetry in your life, hopefully including mine. 

***If you don’t want to order the book, you can read it online at Carrothers’ site.  


“Drawn by some sympathetic note in his poems, young people often wrote to Rilke with their problems and hopes. From 1903 to 1908 Rilke wrote a series of remarkable responses to a young, would-be poet on poetry and on surviving as a sensitive observer in a harsh world.”--Amazon blurb 


Author: Pat Butler
Posted: October 6, 2016, 5:22 pm
Well, almost.  I wrote this post in Costa Rica, but, derailed by a volcano, am only now posting it.  Apparently my publisher was derailed too, as I only last night got the word that my next poetry chapbook, Transplants is now 'live' in advance sales.  So off we go!  I'll keep the post, and and the poetry is yours for the ordering!

It's a rainy day in the tropical rain forest in mountainous Santa Ana, where I am here with a collection of international artists, writers, dancers and musicians, figuring out how to combine art, faith and mission.  The colors, sights and sounds have us all overstimulated, not to mention the Costa Rican coffee! The rain forest itself is visually stunning, with the birds, bugs, and hosts of unseen critters adding their own aural walls of sound. 

Upon arrival, I received the happy news that my 3rd poetry chapbook, Transplants, would go 'live' in advance sales today!  Well, why not?  Life is never neat and tidy...so as I land in Costa Rica to begin this conference, I wonder how to integrate my poetry with the Latin culture that loves it ("For us, it's a sport!" as I've been told.)  

The theme of Transplants is transition.  Who hasn't been in one?  Transplants records poems written in the aftermath of my transition from France to Georgia, 10 years ago.  What one are you currently in? 

One of the happiest parts of that transition was seeing my first set of poems make it to publication, through Finishing Line Press.  FLP has published my previous two chapbooks, through their creative business model: a 6-week advance sales period determines the marketing potential of each chapbook; FLP then determines the press run, and 'pays' me in free copies, in a number proportionate to the sales.  I make income from sales of these free copies, usually through word of mouth, or the readings, book clubs and workshops I organize.  In this way, as many small literary presses go under, FLP remains in the business of helping emerging poets. Gracias FLP!

We've done well together over the past several years, and I'm looking forward to another sprint through the publishing challenge!  Sales are live now until Nov. 18.

Be the first to click here and order!   

Copies will ship as we transition into the New Year.  Maybe poetry will help us all.
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: September 23, 2016, 1:24 pm
Haiku by Pat Butler
Spring/Summer issue of the Aurorean
Available online.

Photo: ”Allium, Heritage Museum & Gardens"
©2014 Cynthia Brackett-Vincent.
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: May 1, 2015, 12:46 am
"Titus the Titmouse" by Patricia Butler has been awarded an Honorable Mention in the 2015 Peach Jam Poetry Contest, sponsored by Peachtree City Library Friends.

Mark your calendars for Friday, April 24th, for the reading and award presentation of the 2015 Peach Jam Poetry Contest chapbook.

This will be an "after hours" event and take place in the main part of the library (to the left as you come in the main entrance).  Dulcimer music will open the program at 7:00 p.m., and the fifteen poems chosen for publication and awards will be read by their authors.  In addition, some guest poets will be reading their own or other poets' works. It will be a fun and relaxing evening.

Come help us celebrate National Poetry Month and support the literary arts!

--from the Peachtree City Library Friends

Thanks to the PTC Library friends!  Always a fun gig, and pleased to have “made the grade” again this year.  Unfortunately, I won’t make the events, as I’m in the State of Connecticut this month. 

Happy National Poetry Month! 
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: April 17, 2015, 6:43 pm
As the sun set slowly on I-85 northbound, I  drove home from Newnan, the Great Peach State Book Tour officially over. 

In the CD player: One Sweet Day by Tom Watts, our musician for the American Pie Tour.  We had just reprised the Tour at the Corner Arts Gallery: Sara DeLuca and Paul Lentz reading, along with yours truly, and Blue Donkey Coffee providing the stellar coffee for our pies.

Jenny, our hostess, was a gem--not only for opening up her gallery to us to perform, but locating chairs, moving space heaters, letting finances go through her system, taking photos and pushing PR.  Thank you, Jenny!

Tom's wife Rebecca, who facilitates our writer's group, closed the afternoon by declaring us a bonafide group, that needs a funky head shot, and to go on the road through the 50-odd libraries in Georgia. What do you think?! 

A great idea that will have to wait...I'm about to close the boatyard for the season...the season of new adventures! 

On January 1, my sister and I began edits of my brother Peter's novel, and we are having a great time!  Who knew how much editing fun we were missing en famille?!  While Mary and Pete hunt for dangling participles, adverbs and passive verbs, I'm tackling structural and character issues.  We're all on grammar police duty.   Grateful for the workout with fiction for a change, and hoping for a writers' retreat this summer with the peeps.

We also took time to edit my chapbook submission "Squibs"--
produced during the November PAD Challenge--now at Poetic Asides, awaiting final judging--due today!  Either way it goes, I'll begin submissions of individual  poems in other journals and see how I do. 

I'll leave a note on the door, while I head out to sea...well, over the sea...four months in Europe await me, and you'll have to shift over to my travel blog if you want to read about those.  Among other things), the trip will include continuing edits on The Culture Shock Poems--with maybe a few additions.

So stay tuned, shift if you like,  and track the continuing adventures of an urban clamdigger in a foreign land.

Ciao for now!  

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: February 2, 2014, 6:22 pm
For those of you who visited this blog only to find an empty space where the Southside Review should have gone, here it is for real :)

SOUTHSIDE BOOK REVIEWS 

Reviews Of Books Recently Written By Southside Authors Compiled by: Forrest W. Schultz 770-583-3258 schultz_forrest@yahoo.com 

Blog Address: http://southsidebookreviews.blogspot.com/ 

November 20, 2013 

Pat Butler Contributes Poetry to the Southside Scene: 

A Review of Pat Butler The Boatman's Daughter 

(Finishing Line Press, 2013), 36 pp $12.00 ISBN: 978-1-622229-424-4 Reviewer: Forrest W. Schultz 

The boatman in the title does not refer to a sailor or a captain of a boat, but to a builder of a boat. Half of this chapbook is the poem ("The Scent of Poplars"); the author has written about this builder, her father, and the analogy it has with life, which is striking because the boat was not finished, which is parallel to that of our lives -- they are not finished here; they only start here. This is the best poem in the collection. The others are short -- some of them very short -- and most are about life on the seashore -- egrets and crabs and the like. The meanings of some of these are clear and others are not (at least to me), which is also like life -- some things we understand; some we do not. Butler, who lives in Fayette County, is involving herself in the local literary scene: she recently appeared at Dogwood Gallery and participated in the recently held Books Down South Festival, where she had some enjoyable conversations with a fellow Fayette poet, Brigitte Byrd. Information is available at http://poemsfromtheboatyard.blogspot.com/, http://www.literaryboatyard.com/ http://www.finishinglinepress.com/

Thank you, Forrest Schultz, and hope to meet some day in the local literary scene!

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: January 20, 2014, 12:03 am
The Polar Vortex...a good time to hunker down and finish edits on the November Poem-A-Day Chapbook Challenge.  This was a family affair, with 2 of my favorite editing peeps--bro Pete and sista soul twin Mary.  The manic marathon editing began New Year's Day, and finalized hours before the deadline (Jan. 7).  With a bow to the Polar Vortex, the celebration drink was Mexican Hot Chipotle Chocolate.  It's a rare winter when we actually get weather cold enough to warrant hot chocolate in the Great Peach State, so it was a treat to put my feet up, sip, and contemplate the next poetic challenge.  

Results will be announced on Groundhog's Day (gotta love it).  Looking forward to seeing how I did in this very competitive venue.  Whichever way it goes, I thoroughly enjoyed the workout with my peeps, and got a new batch of poems to market around. Some of them will go to the upcoming...


Friends of the Peachtree City Library
Fourth Annual Poetry Contest

You might remember I scored first prize on this last year, which would be nice to reprise, as there is a lovely cash prize awarded to the winner. 




(The Friends have received donations toward the prize fund, but still need $100. Additional donations would be much appreciated. Please leave donations at the library circulation desk in an envelope marked “Friends Poetry Contest” or mail to P. O. Box 3641, Peachtree City, GA 30269. Thank you!)

American Pie, Reprise: this was such a successful event, we decided to take our show on the road!

From the press release: 

"Corner Arts Gallery, 14 Jefferson Street, Newnan, invites you to American Pie: a Tour in Words and Music from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 18.  

"Pat’s autobiographical chapbooks, 'Poems from the Boatyard' and 'The Boatman’s Daughter' take us to the New England Coast. Sara’s poetry has been published in numerous regional and national journals. Her latest collection, 'Shearing Time,' paints vivid pictures of farm life in the Upper Midwest. Paul writes of rural Georgia during the Great Depression in his coming-of-age novel, 'The Gospel Truth: Tales from Ty Ty.'  Original music will be performed by Tom Watts, and will include selections from his recent album, 'One Sweet Day.' Refreshments by Blue Donkey Coffee (and pie will be served)."

This will conclude (temporarily) the winter book tour, while I move on to another adventure....watch this space! 








Author: Pat Butler
Posted: January 11, 2014, 12:11 am

Before we get too much further into the New Year, let me wish you a Great Adventure.  For some, entering a new year evokes the thrill of beginning again: the blank slate, the white page, the reset button.   For others, it is beginning with pain, and a question of how to survive.  I'm thankful to be in a period where life is more about the former than the latter. 

However it is with you, may I offer this poem, written several years ago, when I had the chance to visit a beach in my home town on New Year's Eve.

Before leaving this home, it had been my custom to drive to Stehli's beach on New Year's Eve and watch the sunset.  With the gulls screeching and wheeling overhead, the temps usually glacial, and the skyscrapers burnished by a setting western sun, I made my peace with the closing year, and greeted the new one beginning.  A thin time, as the Celts say, when the Unseen Real pierces our earthly realities and makes its Presence felt. 

NEW YEAR’S EVE

When there is that evolution of the self that severs the previous
from what is to come, that sheds an old skin and births a new one,

with no qualms about betraying an old self, with no defenses
worth keeping, no passage worth delaying—this new self walks

toward the sun on the bay of its childhood, taking photos of light
and shadow, cold and ice, kite and cloud, feeding the gulls wheeling,

keening, scrabbling for food.  This new self bumps into its true self,
blown in on a gust of wind, and light shines as on a mother’s face.

These two selves walk along the crust of snow on water’s edge,
chatting in the cold clarity of winter, into the unknown, the unfamiliar,

tingling with beginning, in the surety of the sole possibility,
with resolute steps along the path that is the only option.

May we walk with resolute steps along the path that is our only option: the one into the future.  May the Great Adventure be gentle with you, and may it cause you wonder by the close of the year. 

With prayers and blessings from the Boatyard, Happy New Year and all best wishes for a creative 2014!
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: January 5, 2014, 2:14 pm

Kinda wish I was near a northern boatyard to see the lights and feel the snap of a cold wind before going inside for a hot chocolate...but not that much.  Missing my peeps, but plan to celebrate in balmy Georgia, with the luminaries of Peachtree City, and the luminaries who are my friends :) 

BUT!  I will get a taste of New England as my sister and most of her family forsake the frozen northland to join me in landlocked Atlanta.  We can barely sleep, and they haven't even arrived yet.  But in two days, we intend to squeeze every last ounce of goodness from this historic first visit. 

So the Boatyard will be closed till the New Year while we frolic and play.  Hope you too have some poetic, historic moments with your best peeps, a hot beverage of choice, and balmy weather.  Or snow.  Or whatever it takes.  And for those having a not-so-fun Christmas, may I offer this poem from Jan Richardson: Blessing of the Longest Night. 

I'll leave you with the French gem, Gloria,  one of my personal favorites, featuring soprano Isabelle Savaugeot, who hits notes as high as the oculus under which she sings in L'Eglise Reformee, in the Marais, Paris. Decidedly unboatyardish, but positively poetic. 

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: December 24, 2013, 5:50 pm
How about a little Christmas haiku for your mid-week frenzy? 

Smooth, shiny baubles
The red Volvo estate, yes?
We were happy then.

Itchy, ugly brown
Carpets our hallway, a blight.
Contrasts elegance.

Courtesy of my dear friend and colleague, Dileep, from Australia, of India/Sri Lankan ancestry, married to a South African, living in America.  How's that for a cross-cultural melting pot wrapped up in one purple-clad, red-sneakered individual?!   


Among his many talents, Dileep is a fantastic photographer.  Take a moment to look at his website for a glimpse of some poetry in photos.  

Two other friends are beavering away on their poems, so there may be more before week is out.  I have, apparently, created some monsters...
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: December 19, 2013, 1:45 pm
I always eat peas with honey
I've done it all of my life.
It makes the peas taste funny,
but it keeps them on the knife.

With that and other recitations from "Green Eggs & Ham" and "Jabberwocky," the OM Poet Tea kicked off last Friday, in search of epiphanies...

Did they find them?  The 30 or so tea-loving, poetry-fearing fans gave it their best shot.   First came The "I Can't Write a Poem" Poem warm-up exercise, then the prompt: write about their most memorable Christmas.  Within minutes, chitter chatter gave way to silence.  Not even the clink of a spoon on china could be heard.  There were some expressions of pain and perplexity, to be sure--whether from the exercise or the memory, I can't tell.  But everyone was in 'the zone.' 



When the timer when off, a few brave souls shared their efforts: poignant, funny, or thought-provoking.  One husband and wife, unbeknownst to each other, wrote about the same Christmas: the one when their relationship began. 

The dainties were delightful, the teas perfect for the rainy day, and sales brisk.  Our worker bee hosts, including two handsome young men greeting us at the door, were all diligent in creating a lovely atmosphere. 

No salt water taffy was consumed, but I have one more event to get rid of that box!

Thank you one and all for hosting, participating, cleaning up, and writing!  I'm soliciting sample poems to share next time, so we'll see if I get some takers, and there are more photos on Facebook if you haven't seen them already.   



Author: Pat Butler
Posted: December 8, 2013, 10:31 pm
Hope you all had a fine Thanksgiving, and we won't get into Black Friday.  Let's just say I wrote a few poems about it, and studiously avoided all stores.

I wrapped up my five-event sprint with a week off, unplugged and recovering at home.  Catching up on the pile of paperwork I had been throwing in my apartment the past few weeks, I flipped through a journal picked up at the Florida writers conference.  I had forgotten about reading this interview, with Robert Birnbaum and author Sandra Cisneros.  In it, Ms. Cisneros admitted:

"I don't have very much contact with other writers.  I don't get invited to these things, or I don't go to them... It's very rare.  Even when I do these book fairs...I come in and I go out.  I can't hang around with lots of people these days because I am hypersensitive.  So when I am around a lot of people or a big roomful of people, I get almost autistic.  I get overwhelmed and really tired...

"I think because the kind of work...is so intensive with people that perhaps, whether you realize it or not, you are just absorbing everybody's buzz.  I feel like I am in a box of bees when I am in a room with lots of people and I'm just looking for the door."*

Sandra, you are not alone in the bee box!  Anyone else recognize the symptoms?! 

I had first read the interview after fleeing the conference, having absorbed way too much people buzz.  Sitting on a park bench in St. Augustine, I had laughed out loud in recognition.  Busted!

Very few people have articulated just what happens to the monastic inclinations of the average (introverted) writer, in the face of conferences, book signings and readings.  A box of bees.

Thank you, Sandra Cisneros, for your gift of words!  After a week off, I'm ready to emerge again.  Whether you like buzz or not, there is honey in that bee box!

Next event:  

Dec. 6: "PoeTea," 3:30-5:00 pm, at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA.  Readings, signing, poetry exercises, tea and light refreshments.  Sponsored by the OM Bookstore, with discounts for the season, so c'mon in, sip some tea, write a poem, and squeeze in some Christmas shopping to boot!




*From "Writers Ask," published quarterly by the editors of Glimmer Train Stories...a journal I've never succeeded in scoring an acceptance!   Issue #58, Winter, 2012, Glimmer Train Press, Inc.
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: December 2, 2013, 1:12 am
What a sprint!  I confess this last one was an effort to get to.  A Friday night after an intense work week, following a month of intensity with the book tour, and I was ready for a night off.  

But, fighting fatique, I hauled my brain into gratitude mode, and, with roadie Arwen, my books over to the Peachtree City Library for An Evening of American Pie & Poetry.  It was an astonishing night.  One of the organizers counted over 60 people--a shocker, frankly.  Before the event started, we writers had our typical conversation: "Wonder how many will come tonight..."    Kudos to Paul Lentz for a stellar PR job, and a crew of worker bees who helped set up, serve coffee and goodies, and Tom Watts, working his folk/Americana/blue music. 

My new French poet friend (from the Books Down South event) showed up.  A number of colleagues showed up, plus new fans and the usual suspects of fellow writers from our writers' circle.   Pies were sliced, Blue Donkey Coffee served. There was a festive, expectant air--helped no doubt by the approaching holiday.   

And off we went...me in the hot seat with first position, followed by a fantastic story teller reading one of Paul's stories, and fellow FLP poet Sara DeLuca, reading her works.  Tom played a set, and then we reprised poems, story, poems.  The evening was over before we knew it.  And, IMHO, a home run.  Thanks to all who made it happen, who listened, supported, participated, served.

In fact, I'm already at work on reprising what proved to be a very successful formula.  Watch this space for another event in January.  In the meantime, I'll close the year out with one more event in December:  

Dec. 6: "PoeTea," 3:30-5:00 pm, at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA.  Readings, signing, poetry exercises, tea and light refreshments.  Sponsored by the OM Bookstore, with discounts for the season, so c'mon in, sip some tea, write a poem, and squeeze in some Christmas shopping to boot!

You can also order your stocking stuffers here: link for The Boatman's Daughter, and Poems from the Boatyard  is now available on Kindle.

Have a very happy and meaningful Thanksgiving! 

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: November 25, 2013, 12:56 am
After a quick check-in at the Holiday Inn, I headed over to Flagler College, where the Other Words Conference would be held, and into the adventure of parking in St. Augustine.  I easily found the college (after a quick detour to a boatyard :), and as for parking...let's just say a good workout was in order anyway, after the 6-hr. car ride.  

I registered and looked for the Finishing Line Press peeps, who were nowhere to be found, and spent the few minutes I had left photographing the incredible rotunda and decoration of the front hall.  Architectural ecstasy.  (Yankees, picture a Newport mansion...even the bathroom had a fireplace in it!)   

One elevator ride later, to the 4th floor of Ponce de Leon Hall, more goodness awaited: the newly opened, newly renovated Solarium, the crown jewel of a National Historic Landmark.  I confess it held my attention longer than the opening poets.  More photos, a few sketches, and jottings of thoughts inspired by the arrival in a coastal town.     

The building was one of two posh hotels Henry Flagler built in the 1880s—an incredible Spanish Renaissance–revival structure with towers, turrets, and stained glass by Tiffany.  When we moved from readings to nibbles, I followed some out onto the terraces, where St. Augustine twinkled by Matanzas Bay.  Magical.  "I get to spend four days here?!" I marveled.  With only my iphone with me at the time, I quickly filled my camera roll with dozens of shots of the panoramic views (none of which I can download at the moment unfortunately--but do follow the links above).

The renovation completed this summer, to mark the 125th anniversary of construction of the hotel. Ponce became Flagler College in 1968, and the Solarium was used as a library, occasional classroom, writing lab, and offices for the college newspaper.  It was closed off in the 1970's for safety reasons.  What a shame.  What joy for me.  Writing, talking about writing, learning about publishing, editing and the digital convolutions going on in all of the above, in a national landmark, surrounded by beach, boat and salt marsh...can you spell B.L.I.S.S.?!  

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: November 10, 2013, 1:07 pm
The book tour continues, with another event under my belt, new friends and connections, and a few less copies of books on hand. 

Books Down South was an awesome gathering of local literati, filled with a lot of energy and camaraderie.  My highlight: I was stationed next to a French poet!  How cool is that?  So while the literati swirled around us, Brigitte Byrd and I chatted in French.  If anyone approached our table, Brigitte leapt up to announce, "We are the poets!"  Who could resist the charm of a French accent?! 

Well, quite a few actually.  We had a few sales, and while I was quite satisfied with mine, Brigitte was frustrated.  When one of the organizers consoled us with typical American cheer--"It's more about the connections you make than the books you sell!"--Brigitte stared her down.  Awkward silence.  The typical French reaction at that point would have been to flip all the books up in the air, and storm home to write about it.


Sure enough, as soon as our chirpy organizer left, Brigitte looked at me and said in French, "That's not French.  We would fling all these books in your face and leave!" 

I laughed, and she relaxed a little as I bought one of her books and asked her to sign it.  We will be in touch for coffee soon; in the meantime, I am enjoying her  "Song of a Living Room."  Brigitte has invited me to read at Clayton State University's poetry lecture series next year.  Mais oui!  Bien sur!

In the meantime, the next clambake for me is in St. Augustine, FL.  I leave Thursday, coming back in time for the Dogwood Gallery evening.  And another event has edged into the calendar the following week. 

Looking for more amazement and hope you are part of it!  

Nov. 7-10: 2013 Other Words Conference, Florida Literary Arts Coalition, Flagler College, St. Augustine, FL.  I'll be attending as a poet with Finishing Line Press, but this also affords time to promote my book, take advantage of a number of workshops, and network.  I'm looking forward to a little change of pace and a day or two to explore St. Augustine.   

Nov. 14: Dogwood Gallery, 6:30-8:30 pm: Book Launch Party. Stop for some poetry, art, wine and nibbles! 

Nov. 22: An American Tour in Words and Music: Friends of the Peachtree City Library invite you to “An American Tour in Words and Music” from 7:00—9:00 PM on Friday, November 22. Local authors Pat Butler, Sara DeLuca, and Paul Lentz will read from their recently published books. Music will be performed by Tom Watts, and will include selections from his recent album, “One Sweet Day.”  (This is an “after-hours event; only the front door of the library will be open.)

Pat is the author of the autobiographical chapbooks, “Poems from the Boatyard” and “The Boatman’s Daughter.” Sara’s poetry has been published in numerous regional and national journals. She will read from her new chapbook, “Shearing Time.” Paul writes of rural Georgia during the Great Depression in his coming-of-age novel, “The Gospel Truth: Tales from Ty Ty.”

Refreshments by Blue Donkey Coffee—a regular at the Peachtree City Farmers Market in the Aberdeen Village Shopping Center. 

Dec. 6: "PoeTea," 3:30-5:00 pm, at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA.  Details to follow!   

Reminders:  

To order The Boatman's Daughter,  here's the link.

Poems from the Boatyard  is now available on Kindle.

Website: theliteryarboatyard.com,  &  iphone app!




Author: Pat Butler
Posted: November 3, 2013, 10:59 pm
...and my second child has had quite a busy week...but we're sleeping through the night :)

The Boatman's Daughter arrived, Poems from the Boatyard  went Kindle, and my first book event took place last Saturday.

If you're missing the festivities because you didn't get a chance to pre-order, here's the link again.

Round 2 in my Fall book tour comes up tomorrow, with the Books Down South inaugural event (see below).  My bags are loaded and my photographer is ready in the wings (BTW, you can see her capture of the first event on Facebook.  Thank you Silvi!)  All these are being fed to Stephen Andrews as he squirrels away at my new website, with technology I barely know exists.  We're getting there.  Take a peek: www.theliteryarboatyard.com, and don't forget to download the iphone app!

Thanks for the encouragements and FB likes and comments - generous, kind and abundant!

Onward! 
 
October 26: Books Down South Book Fair, 10 am - 3 pm,  at the former Rivers Elementary School, Sandy Creek Rd. & Veteran's Pkwy, Fayetteville, GA.  Book sellers, Author Signings, Storytelling, Children's Readers, Speakers, Giveaways.

Nov. 7-10: 2013 Other Words Conference, Florida Literary Arts Coalition, Flagler College, St. Augustine, FL.  At the request of Finishing Line Press, which will have a table at the fair, I will attend as an FLP poet, and can promote my book.  This also affords time to take advantage of a number of opportunities: getting to know more of the publisher's associates, attend workshops, and network.  I've never done anything like this before, so ready to plunge into the next level of author development. 

Nov. 14: Dogwood Gallery, 6:30-8:30 pm: Book Launch Party. Stop for some poetry, art, wine and nibbles. 

Dec. 6: "PoeTea," 3-5 pm, at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA.  Details to follow! 




Author: Pat Butler
Posted: October 25, 2013, 11:54 am
The good news came in double doses yesterday, to close out my Friday work day: The Boatman's Daughter has shipped, and Poems from the Boatyard will be going to Kindle format!  Yippee!

So today began with preparing the next set of docs and images for another format...reminding me of visa application days...subject of my third collection being worked on!  Stay tuned for that one.   The Kindle format will be available internationally, so my global peeps can finally get a copy. 

You should have your pre-ordered copy this week, and if you didn't get a chance to pre-order, here's the link again.

A new website is almost complete, but you can take a peek now: www.theliteryarboatyard.com, as is the new iphone app.  Many thanks to Stephen Andrews for the hours of technical wizadry he has invested in the Boatyard.  If you need website design, you want to work with Stephen!

And don't forget the Fall line up of literary events!  Hope you can make one, and hope you enjoy the poems.  Thanks for your patience in this last delay, and see you around the county or Boatyard!

Fall Schedule: 

October 19: Open Mic Matinee, Poetry & Spoken Word Performance, 1:00 pm, Fayette County Public Library,  1821 Heritage Park Way, Fayetteville, GA 30214 · 770-461-8841.  Reception and Book Signing to follow, including light refreshments.

October 26: Books Down South Book Fair, 10 am - 3 pm,  at the former Rivers Elementary School, Sandy Creek Rd. & Veteran's Pkwy, Fayetteville, GA.  Book sellers, Author Signings, Storytelling, Children's Readers, Speakers, Giveaways.

Nov. 7-10: 2013 Other Words Conference, Florida Literary Arts Coalition, Flagler College, St. Augustine, FL.  At the request of Finishing Line Press, which will have a table at the fair, I will attend as an FLP poet, and can promote my book.  This also affords time to take advantage of a number of opportunities: getting to know more of the publisher's associates, attend workshops, and network.  I've never done anything like this before, so ready to plunge into the next level of author development. 

Nov. 14: Dogwood Gallery, 6:30-8:30 pm: Book Launch Party. Stop for some poetry, art, wine and nibbles. 

Dec. 6: "Poetry Tea" at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA.  Details to follow! 


Author: Pat Butler
Posted: October 12, 2013, 2:33 pm

Another event makes it onto my busy fall calendar:  Books Down South launches this month, a premier event in the Southern Arc (southern suburbs of Atlanta).  This is a pretty big deal in these parts, featuring 40 local and regional authors, including some NY Times bestselling ones.  Our local literary world of publishers, authors, and libraries is abuzz. Glad to be part of making a little Peachtree City history here, even if we're nowhere near a boatyard. See schedule below and come help us make this a home run event!

I'll be sharing a book-signing table with two friends from my writers' circle, and we will be donating one of the giveaway gift baskets. 

Update from Finishing Line Press: the galleys have gone to the printer this week, and The Boatman's Daughter is queued up!  She is due to birth this month, although I have alerted FLP that my first event is in two weeks, and would be much obliged if I could receive some copies before then!  

Fall Schedule: 

October 19: Open Mic Matinee, Poetry & Spoken Word Performance, 1:00 pm, Fayette County Public Library,  1821 Heritage Park Way, Fayetteville, GA 30214 · 770-461-8841.  Reception and Book Signing to follow, including light refreshments.

October 26: Books Down South Book Fair, 10 am - 3 pm,  at the former Rivers Elementary School, Sandy Creek Rd. & Veteran's Pkwy, Fayetteville, GA.  Book sellers, Author Signings, Storytelling, Children's Readers, Speakers, Giveaways.

Nov. 7-10: 2013 Other Words Conference, Florida Literary Arts Coalition, Flagler College, St. Augustine, FL.  At the request of Finishing Line Press, which will have a table at the fair, I will attend as an FLP poet, and can promote my book.  This also affords time to take advantage of a number of opportunities: getting to know more of the publisher's associates, attend workshops, and network.  I've never done anything like this before, so ready to plunge into the next level of author development. 

Nov. 14: Dogwood Gallery, 6:30-8:30 pm: Book Launch Party. Stop for some poetry, art, wine and nibbles. 

Dec. 6: "Poetry Tea" at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA.  Details to follow! 

Thanks for your interest and see ya around the Boatyard! 
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: October 5, 2013, 12:19 am
The second set of galleys has come and gone this week, and now I await word that The Boatman's Daughter is going to print!  I'll let you know as soon as that happens, and when the book tour begins.

In the meantime, you can pencil in some dates, if you're in the Tyrone vicinity:

October 19: Open Mic Matinee, Poetry & Spoken Word Performance, 1:00 pm, Fayette County Public Library,  1821 Heritage Park Way, Fayetteville, GA 30214 · 770-461-8841.  Reception and Book Signing to follow, including light refreshments. 

Nov. 14, 6:30-8:30 pm: Dogwood Gallery, Book Launch Party. Stop for some poetry, art, wine and nibbles. 

Dec. 6, afternoon: "Poetry Tea" at OM, 285 Lynnwood Ave., Tyrone, GA

These will warm up my poetic and performance muscles! I only hope my book arrives in time for that first outing.  In any case, I will read and have postcards on hand, as well as a few copies of Poems from the Boatyard.  Come to one or all, as you are able and interested!

Into the Fall we go...a great season to curl up with a cup of apple cider, maybe a fire in the fireplace, and a dash of poetry.  Have a great one, and thanks for your patience with small press publishing!     

To be continued...
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: September 21, 2013, 1:22 pm
Back safe, sound and sane from travels! 

Galleys arrived shortly after I did, and needed a bit of work, so back they went to the publisher.  I'm awaiting the new galleys, and guestimating that The Boatman's Daughter will go several weeks past her due date.  May it not be too long, but...

Last word from Finishing Line (in mid-August) was that the printer was running two weeks behind schedule.  Assuming that the galley delay adds another couple of weeks to the mix, we're looking at end of September if you ask me.  Can we consider this building suspense?!

In the meantime, I've been working on a few book launch parties is these Southern parts, with the first scheduled for November at Dogwood Gallery, right here in Tyrone, GA.  Owner Greg Blair, friend and awesome dude, runs a fun and inviting gallery which I frequent at any and every excuse, even if I have to invent one.

Mark your calendars now, if you're in the Tyrone area: November 14, 6:30-8:30 pm.  Come prepared to exercise your poetic muscles, learn some back story and family history to both chapbooks, and view some artwork!  Thanks, Greg, for the opportunity.  (BTW: Greg does a fantastic framing job and is VERY reasonable.  Unless you're going to buy a ready-made, you won't do better.  Give him a try.)

Two other local events are sloooowly developing...stay tuned for details.  And I've got a gig in St. Augustine, FL in November--details also to follow.

So, a promising return to the Boatyard, and the gears will progressively crank up as we head into the fall.  Sorry for the delay on The Boatman's Daughter - will keep you posted! 

Happy Labor Day from the Boatyard!
Author: Pat Butler
Posted: September 1, 2013, 5:15 pm
For those of you who have not already seen it on the social media, that's the new magic number...final tally of advance sales. So, I'm in for a pressrun of 500 copies - and glad to have reached that goal, after such an underwhelming start! 

Next on the agenda is a visit to some friends overseas, and attend a conference.  So the Boatyard will be a bit quiet till next month, while I cogitate on important matters, book tours and signings.  It promises to be an active Fall, so unplugging a bit now in anticipation.

Thanks to all who made it happen.  Another month or two, and The Boatman's Daughter will see the light of day! 

In the meantime, storing up reading material for my trek overseas.  One of them is "Pity the Beautiful," an interview with Dana Gioia on the release of his new book.

Dana Gioia is one of those poets who is, as this interviewer says, outside of my galaxy.  I first heard him speak in New York City, at an IAM Conference.  I'm not sure how this article plays out fully; I got in knee-deep and then had to bookmark it to get onto more mundane matters like laundry and food shopping.  Pity the mundane...


One gem of a quote, and then I'm off.  Follow me here till I get back!

"When we collectively lose our ability to have sustained linear attention, whole types of thought are impossible." 

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: July 27, 2013, 2:51 pm
I've made it past the doldrums and into publication--almost into the next level in the pressrun.  Unbelievable--and hoping to nail it today.  

Thanks to all who jumped on board, with orders coming in fast and furious these past few weeks.  With that traction, the publisher extended the advance sales period one week, to see if I could hit the next level, and I'm grateful for the opportunity.

Today is the last day.  If I do double the press run, I 'earn' double the copies. I'm almost sure this will happen, and it's just extraordinary how much as happened through this sales period.  I sometimes feel like I'm in a game show.  

Today is the last day to order The Boatman's Daughter!

So peeps!  Today is the last call to reserve your copy of The Boatman's Daughter.  Here's the link, and you have until midnight! 

(If you have trouble with it, email: 
flpbookstore@aol.com.  International shipping also available.)  

I have 14 more copies to go.  I will then do a happy dance and collapse in a heap on the veranda, possibly with a mint julep and a crab cake in celebration.  We'll all do happy dance while social media marketing blows out to sea...

I've been posting some teasers the past few days, as part of the closing ceremonies, but in case you missed them, here's the first:

Padre & the Chaperones

Padre functioned best as the football coach--
head set back beneath his black padre hat,
with its peaked dome and pom-pom top,
eyes half-closed like some sun-drunk cat,
neither holy nor jovial, overweight and poker-faced,
cigar in left hand, some boy's ear in his right.
A man's man, the men would say--
he still holds them rapt...

Don't forget to pin, tweet, share, link in, forward--every little bit of exposure helps.

Thank you, Finishing Line Press, for extending, and thanks so much to all of you who have ordered and encouraged.  I'm looking forward to wrapping this baby up, and moving on to the book tour preps.


Don't forget: The Boatman's Daughter is scheduled for release in mid-September, 2013.  YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE THE CHAPBOOK THEN.  If you get antsy, you can order Poems from the Boatyard from Finishing Line Press as well, or through Amazon.  
  


Author: Pat Butler
Posted: July 14, 2013, 12:39 pm
Torrential downpours continue here in Atlanta, but the poetry world is alive and well.  I've been hunkered down up with a 3rd poetry manuscript, coming down the homestretch...a little more gathering, a few poems left to revise, then the organization and layout...getting there!
  
Finishing Line Press has granted me an extra week on advance sales, which will hopefully be enough to push me up the press run ladder!  Thank you FLP!  July 14 is my new deadline.
 
They've also invited me to a book fair to represent them in St. Augustine's in Florida!  That is a big deal and a tempting offer!  Putting the crowbar to the calendar...and the wallet!  Stay tuned for details.  The conference takes place in November.

Then a friend called to tell me she had met a guy from BlogTalkRadio--who hosts online radio interviews of poets!  She nominated me, I'm looking into it, and will keep you posted.  Sundays at 7--listen in! 

Dan Veach of Atlanta has been named this year's Georgia Author of the Year for his Finishing Line Press book ELEPHANT WATER (award presented by The Georgia Writers Association).  I don't know Dan, but know of him, and asked him for an endorsement on The Boatman's Daughter.  Didn't realize he was so busy...sorry Dan!  But congratulations!  Glad to be in such good company with you and Finishing Line Press.

That's the latest from the Boatyard, peeps, and I close with another call to mobilize you over this soggy and cool July 4th, to reserve your copy of The Boatman's Daughter.  Here's the link, and if you have any trouble with it, the email: flpbookstore@aol.com 

I'm looking to sell 40 more copies, so if you can help lower that number, I will seriously appreciate you!  International orders also accepted!

One more week of harassment, and my social media lips will be sealed until at least next book signing...

Why you should order now:
. my press run double, which means my payment in copies doubles;
. you will save on shipping costs; 
. I will seriously appreciate you!

Ready?  Go!  And don't forget to pin, tweet, share, link in, forward!

Grateful...and Happy 4th!  Hope you're getting a little more sunshine in your corner of the world, and if not, there's some poetry to be had...


Author: Pat Butler
Posted: July 4, 2013, 9:59 pm
The doldrums are over!  The Boatman's Daughter has taken off, and momentum boosted me to the bottom rung of the publishing scale.  That means a Kindle version too - yippee!  Positively exponential...

I frankly wasn't expecting that, but frankly, most of what has happened during this advance sales period I haven't expected.  Like a day on a boat...

This has been a lesson in Zeitgeist and humility.  The lessons I learned in the Boatyard are serving me well, to navigate this current stream.  


Pushing onto the next rung: 105 copies.    

Why is this important?  

It's all about the pressrun, determined as follows: 

Prepublication sales between 55-104 copies sold = 250 pressrun. Payment = 25 copies.

Prepublication sales between 105-154 copies sold = 500 pressrun. Payment = 50 copies.

Prepublication sales between 155-204 copies sold = 750 pressrun. Payment = 75 copies.

Prepublication sales between 205+ copies sold = 1000 pressrun.  Payment =100 copies  

If you’ve already placed your order, thank you! 

If you forgot, or got stuck in the hamster wheel, were planning to order and haven’t yet, now would be a great time.  You can order with credit card or PayPal online here.  Click, pay and you’re done! 

If you ARE HAVING PROBLEMS WITH THE NEW WEBSITE,  email flpbookstore@aol.com  They will call and take your info over the phone,  process your card, or give info for mail orders.   

42 more pre-orders will double my press-run and my royalty. That’s only 6 a day...
And if you’re at all inclined, tweeting, reposting, sharing, pinning, linking back, or plugging The Boatman's Daughter on your site would help… a lot!  (Buttons are on the sidebar.) Thanks so much.  
Think I can make it in a week?!  Living in the exponential...



  

Author: Pat Butler
Posted: June 30, 2013, 12:00 pm

Interesting how much has changed in two years...  

In my first book marketing foray, I just caught the tail end of the Facebook frenzy.  The migration off FB went almost as rapidly as those 8 weeks of advance sales.  

My publisher informed me that since 75% of book sales happen online, I'd better bone up.  That sent me to The Idiot's Guide of Social Media Marketing, where I had just enough time to read, ping and tweet Poems from the Boatyard.  I even managed a You Tube.  It was kind of fun, kind of dizzying.      

Two years later, it's a different landscape.  Bored with Facebook, we're on Pinterest, Google and Instagram. Blogs have clogged the web.  Ping is gone, replaced by Hoot Suite.  Everything seems a quest to own people's eyeballs. 

I do like learning new things, but my two-year-old Idiot's Guide (which I never did finish) is almost obsolete.  Shift happens.  (If you read no further on this blog, watch that video!)  

A capsule version: Bill Gates earns about $250 per second...160 billion emails are sent daily...97% of which are spam...in the time it takes you to read this blog, 375 babies will have been born in India.  To reach a target audience of 50 million, it take two years on Facebook.  

I have 13 days to go and 14 copies of The Boatman's Daughter--so a lot can happen!  What I need to happen: sell 14 more copies to go to print.

What I want to happen: sell 205.  Why?  Then my print run shoots up to 1000, of which I receive 100 copies.  Hey we live in exponential times!  This is a modest goal!

Order now before shift happens! You can order The Boatman's Daughter with credit card or PayPal online here.  

Hanging on for the ride...


Author: Pat Butler
Posted: June 23, 2013, 9:21 pm